301-829-6944

A Simple Thank You

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin

The start of our conversation went like this…. “Hey Girls! Time for me to write a blog. Why don’t I write from a perspective of a high school student. What are some poor manners that you see in your life as  high school students?”

Both of my daughters replied with a very simple answer.

People forget to say ‘thank you.’

They forget to say “Thank you for letting me borrow a pencil.”

They forget to say “Thank you for giving me a ride home.”

They forget to say “Thank you for inviting me to dinner with your family.”

In today’s complicated, technologically-overloaded, reality-TV-is-word, way too “connected” world of teenagers, I expected a different answer.

But I got a simple answer. Their simple answer reminded me, once again, that our every day courteous words are what truly makes a difference.  We learn the magic words when we are toddlers. They never change, get old or outdated. I’ve written a short blog about the magic words before.

As you go about your day today, think simply.  Say ‘Please’,  ‘Excuse me,’  ‘I’m sorry’ and ‘You’re welcome’.  Most of all, say ”Thank you’. My teenage daughters will notice if you don’t. And we all know that kids, regardless of their age,  are always watching…and learning.

By the way, my daughters also mentioned that is is rude when students fail to yield in the hallways and bump right into you. Our teen driver also added, “Yes! And when the drivers don’t stop for you to cross the parking lot when you are walking to your car!”

Mind Your Manners,

Kelly

 

 

6 Comments
  1. And, how about “you’re welcome”! When did “No problem” become the substitute?

    Thank you for your interesting articles. They remind what is important and how to be a better person.

    • Kelly

      Thank you for your comment Missy! Agreed – all the magic words – including “You’re welcome” should be part of our daily vocabulary. I’ve also heard from several people who feel the same way about the now commonly accepted “No problem”. Mostly because it infers the opposite – that you/your situation were a problem! I always consider the intent of words. Most of the time, I don’t feel that the person who said “no problem” intended to tell me that I was once a problem….most of the time 🙂

  2. Great article, Kelly and unfortunately, so true! Thanks for sharing!

  3. Great job, Kelly! I so agree and am constantly stressing with my family, how important it is to continue to use basic manners in all walks of life, and I am particularly passionate about using words properly. The idea of replacing perfectly good words with others, for no reason, makes no sense to me. For instance, people these days replace the word “problem” with “issue”, I presume to be “politically correct”, when in fact, the two words have different meanings. I want my children to use words properly! Nice article.

    • Kelly

      Thank you for your kind words of support Ginny!I know for a fact that you are doing an amazing job teaching your kids excellent manners and using words properly! Manners and polite words are distinguishing behaviors these days.

Leave a Reply


Nothing's Finer Than A Fine Young Diner

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin

Use these table manners tips to turn your child into a delightful diner!  Read Kelly’s article as featured in Eastern Home and Travel Magazine.

fine young diner article

Pack Your Manners

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin

Traveling with kids? Read Kelly’s article as published in Eastern Home & Travel

Networking Etiquette: What Do You Know?

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin

Thank you to Team Network for having me as their guest speaker at their Netfast in Rockville, MD. Click on the link to watch our netiquette discussion.

Team Network Netfast

Manners Schmanners! Read Kelly’s Interview in FindIt Frederick!

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin